Cheap & easy dehydrating.

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  LNsGirl 3 weeks ago.

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  • #975

    Anonymous

    I love dehydrating as both a method of preservation and food storage but like most home preserving, the preparation can be a pain. I came across a video youtube some years ago that I thought was great (I don’t remember who it was) Dehydrating frozen vegetables I thought it was inspired! I have a few favourites that are cheaper than buying and processing fresh and others that we use a lot of. I have had great success with the following
    Peas
    Sweetcorn
    Mixed vegetables(with diced carrot)
    Sliced mixed bell peppers
    Sliced Mushrooms
    Chopped cabbage
    Chopped onion

    The onion is a bit of a cop out, but the results are worth it. 🙂

    For anyone who doesn’t have room for a vegetable garden I think it would be a great way to fill your stores with food you have some sort of quality control over for not a great deal of money or time.
    It’s then just a case of storing either in jars(my preferred method) or in Mylar or vacuum sealing

  • #998

    Atypical Sapien
    Participant

    For me, a small 5.5oz can or two of spicy V8 was well worth the extra weight on backpacking trips. The main problem was they were small cans and most of the weight is in the can and water.

    I decided to try to dehydrate V8 after getting a new dehydrator.
    2 cups of V8 will fit in my solid fruit roll-up tray insert.
    Once the V8 has dried to a scab-like consistency (yes, I know there are some better descriptive terms) place in a zip-lock bag and freeze overnight.
    Once frozen the dried V8 will grind in a coffee grinder or a small chopper. A large bottle of V8 will turn into about two fingers worth of powder that reconstitutes very nicely, tastes wonderful with vodka and is also great for adding flavor to most camping meal. Its also a good thickener and flavor enhancement for soups.

    Now, if I can figure out how to dehydrate Guinness.

  • #999

    Anonymous

    Do you know, it never occurred to me to do that. I dehydrate fruit pulp, tubes of tomato puree and fruit yoghurt to make leathers and even home made stock. I never gave that sort of thing a thought.

    Oh and if you do find a way to dehydrate Guinness do let me know!

  • #1014

    Anonymous

    I dehydrate the store brand frozen potatoes. The ones they have diced into squares. Makes a really easy add when I am making soup and don’t feel like bothering with fresh potatoes.

  • #1032

    annaraven
    Participant

    I tried dehydrating frozen berries once. What a pain in the patootie. Got hardly nothin’ from my efforts. Like, never mind! So I don’t do that anymore.

    Dehydrated veggies though – I’m all for it. And dehydrated kale and other greens are great too. Really good for when you want to do soups.

  • #1087

    Anonymous

    Annaraven, I have a jar with ‘dehydrated’ blackberries in my freezer. Such a waste of time. Those were fresh and on sale. I have no clue what I am going to do with them, but I am thinking a freezer type jam my kids can eat with a spoon! I don’t like them, too seedy for me.

  • #2874

    xtron jones
    Participant

    I love fried okra, and grow my own. the only to keep okra is to dehydrate it.
    but be warned… you fill a few trays, and when it’s done your first thought is “where did all my okra go??” it shrinks up a LOT.
    and then when you rehydrate it, you think “1/4 cup dosen’ty look like near enough, i’ll add some more” only to realize it ballons up as much as it shrank down.
    and fried dehydrated okra fixed in January tastes like it just came out of the garden.

    • #21899

      LNsGirl
      Participant

      I bought some frozen Okra when it was on sale for $1 a bag (12oz) and dehydrated it. Our local store often has frozen veggies on sale for 10/$10. I buy them up. Some I dehydrate, and some I cook from frozen. I have early peas, carrots, corn, butter beans and more frozen and dehydrated. Love me some fresh veggies all year round.

  • #3377

    LNsGirl
    Participant

    Questions for everyone. Do you blanch your fresh produce before dehydrating. And, do you dehydrate freshnor canned or both?

  • #3492

    Anonymous

    I’ve always had best results by blanching fresh produce, but you don’t have to.

    I have dehydrated canned peaches as a snack treat when camping, but other than that as canned food is already preserved I don’t bother.
    Maybe someone else can answer that question.

  • #6522

    Old Goat
    Participant

    I dehydrate berries both canned, frozen and fresh depending on the price, then powder them. A lot works down to very little in weight and space.I was surprised when some of you didn’t know what to do with them when powdered! They are great mixed in with cake batters, cobbler mixes and cookies!

    Blue berries were a bit of a pill because of the skins but if you put them in a blender to break down the tough skins instead of cutting them individually they work much better in the dehydrator.

  • #6526

    Mouse Wizard
    Participant

    https://www.backpackingchef.com/food-dehydrator-recipes.html

    Buy the book, if for nothing but the way to properly dehydrate ground beef. Properly spiced it’s a great snack food on the trail. Keeps forever in the refrigerator, lasts over a week on the trail. Haven’t tried freezing it; not sure it’s a good idea.

    With their book, you can plan out and store the meals necessary for a 14-day bug-out, which is what FEMA is now recommending. A friend of mine who deployed to Florida this fall to provide assistance on site was told to take 10 days supply including water.

    So kitting up a decent supply of food is essential if you’re going to be bugging out. Trust me; the Datrex bars and similar ilk get really old really fast. You could die of taste fatigue. One sure moral booster / maintainer is food you like and are familiar with. Especially if you have kids bugging along.

  • #6542

    namelus
    Participant

    When I go truck camping I pre marinate and freeze chicken pork and beef, use them as ice blocks and food ready to go…..

     

    Out in the wild and you can smell tandoori chicken with naan rice and dal . Next night beer bbq mesquite back ribs with corn bread and baked beans… third is roast cow au Vin with baked potatoes and asparagus or fiddle heads if in season. You know roughing it lol. Day 4 is dehydrated food or caned if nothing fresh caught.

  • #6543

    namelus
    Participant

    There is dehydrated alcohol

    https://palcohol.com/

    It’s like tang tubes mix with water and drink, ok taste but you can pack a ton more or you go everclear use as fuel for stove disinfectant and drink spiker. We put it in a two liter plastic bottle so even if lose while on water it floats hard to puncture, just make sure well marked or hilarity can unfold.

     

  • #9200

    Littlesister
    Participant

    Found some mixed veggies and corn on a great sale. All frozen so will try to get them dehydrated as soon as air conditioner goes in next week. They should be here Monday or Tuesday to get the job done. Will take a full day. Then I can get back to some of the things I am going through and start doing some dehydrating. Made jerkey a few weeks ago. So much for that lasting as grandson and hubby got into that.

  • #21896

    Renee Giles
    Participant

    I would appreciate recommendations for a good quality and yet economically priced dehydrator. We have a large family living on a very limited income. Versatility would be a highly desirable plus. Any suggestions on features or specifications also appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Renee

  • #21898

    LNsGirl
    Participant

    Check out thrift stores first. Then look online at Amazon and Walmart. This is close to the end of season so these should be on sale now or very soon. Nesco is a good brand. I have one of these and love it.

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