Homesteaders, catastrophists run for the hills to flee U.S. uncertainty

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  namelus 3 weeks, 4 days ago.

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  • #25862

    Crow Bar
    Keymaster

    http://news.trust.org/item/20200127092603-ks7hg

    Do you really want a hedge fund manager for a neighbor?

  • #25882

    OldMt Woman
    Participant

    Hope some of those are going to practice the rural realities for a while before they think they’ll be depending on those skill sets…..

    OldMtWoman

  • #25889

    Tolik
    Participant

    Zombies . The fact that the average life span of a mountain man , was 35 years , infant mortality rate was so high in the 1800’s , that people didnt bother to name their child until a certain age , should tell them something about that life style .

  • #25895

    Crow Bar
    Keymaster

    I think most of them are too short sighted for that.

  • #25910

    namelus
    Participant

    there is a place with 100 km of here which is privately owned a hunting reserve by a very wealthy family. It has set up for long term survival and is very defensible with small group. Worked out there and saw what I was allowed to… money was not an object they had a concrete batch plant  for the amount they poured rough guess 10,000 cubic meters of 35 mpa heavy rebar with elastomeric concrete. There where 24 b train semis driving down  that road and came back empty. They had to pass through commercial scale.

     

    So how much room would you need to store 48 semi trailers of gear? And how long would that last you? There are only 3 buildings above ground and zero chance they could hold that amount of goods.

     

    Only reason I know about concrete is they had to get it over the commercial scale. The same with the fuel. 4 trucks 5,000 gallon for that and the pup behind….. that was after build was done. None of the equipment left.

     

    That is some serious prepping beyond what most could afford in many life times.

  • #25914

    Loving Life
    Participant

    Ok. I recently made the move from one of the five largest US cities to a very rural area (no mail delivery, dirt roads, no cable TV, etc). I made the move for several reasons, including some mentioned in the cited article.

    A person such as me can successfully make the move if they embrace the lifestyle. I have a wood stove (yes, I have successfully learned to cook on it), solar, well, garden, etc.

    More and more people are making the move from the cities to the rural. I think the trend will continue.

  • #25925

    Littlesister
    Participant

    I really do wish I could move out from where I am.  Maybe one day before it’s to late to make that move. But age and Dh’s health. We are stuck.. My grandparents ran a homestead and I learned a lot from them. As for DH he also came from a family that farmed. We have a lot of the know how but not the land nor at this time the ability to get away from where we are now.

    I must say if someone was moving out of the city to live off grid, they best be able to know what they are doing and learn to work from sunup to sundown. It is not an easy task.  You need to have those skills and know how to use them. Best to practice and learn before going full steam ahead without that knowlege.

  • #25927

    namelus
    Participant

    It’s rough starting and only partially knowing what you will be doing lots of pricey mistakes. In post shot it will be lethal mistakes since you can’t go to store and buy more.

     

     

     

     

  • #25939

    Whirlibird
    Participant

    I wonder how many “coty folks” are grssly underestimated.

    Its not like we are talking about a 19yo nurse who plays in a band. Or are we?

    And rural life ain’t all its advertised as. Too many make it out to be perfection incarnate. I remember cold nights and mornings, waiting for the heat and breakfast.

    Maybe I am soft, but I happen to like chiropractors, physical therapy, movies, cheeseburgers and more.

  • #25940

    OldMt Woman
    Participant

    LOL Whirlibird.  We ALL do.  Well, maybe not movies for me….books!  Who wants to give up the ease and yes, safety of modern medical care….fresh veggies in January…electricity and devices….   But if worst came to worst….does a person have what it takes to set it all aside and begin again under whatever conditions they find themselves in?  Or would they slip into depression over all the loss?  Or would they fire up with fury and …become crazy dangerous?  All of the above.  [sometimes all those reactions in the same person!]

    Some rural folks are idiots and dangerous.  We all know some of them.  So are some urban folks.  We all know some of them too.  And there are splendid folks in any category.  But….if urban folks plan to ‘run for the hills’…..they had better learn the skill sets needed for the location they choose.

    I’ve lived urban ….worked inner city urban.  I learned the ways and means of that environment after being rural since birth.  But…I chose rural…it suits me.

    OldMtWoman

    • #25947

      Crow Bar
      Keymaster

      @oldmtwoman,
      Great post!
      Spot on with the ease and safety. There is a part in The Incredibles 2 movie where one of the characters said that people will trade for convenience anytime.
      I have spent about the past hour trying to get the fire going in the kitchen. How many would give up after 15 minutes and trade in for the convenience of pushing a button?

      Occasionally I/we do go see a movie, but it is usually something we have to be really excited about (Godzilla, Downton Abby). Otherwise, meh. I like a good book. Real, physical book in my hand.
      I do sometimes miss the experience of being waited on at a fine dinning restaurant. A real restaurant with a chef in the kitchen. Not a chain. We budget to dine out about once a quarter. Otherwise, it is me in the kitchen, a library full of cook books and books on cooking technique. I have gotten pretty good at making a number of dishes that could be served at a fine dinning restaurant.
      Last night it was old dinner style skillet hamburgers, on homemade potato buns, with homemade ranch sauce and oven baked french fries.

  • #25942

    Whirlibird
    Participant

    We tried rural when we first hit this area. The birds on the fence were great, the deer walking through the yard were great.
    The 10 mine one way to town, now that got old quick. Especially with kids in activities. Each kid needing to be somewhere else at different times. 100 miles per day without trying.
    Post-retirement, maybe. But at that point, I am thinking about someplace warmer.

    The modern homesteaders I have seen, many return to town because of the missing attributes, like ease of access, snow removal, etc.

  • #25948

    Loving Life
    Participant

    Having moved rural recently, I and many of the recent transplants are looking for a simpler life. I do not want to be near a large city with it’s four star restaurants, massive 24 hr movie theater, etc. I am ok with occasionally driving a couple hours to a bigger city if needed for a rare treat, medical treatment, etc. When I lived near the big city, it would often take me more than an hour one way to get to my destination in the city.

    I am also not “homesteading” (living completely off the grid, growing and eating all I need) either. In my rural area, I don’t know of one single true homesteader. Most of us in my rural area grow some of our own veggies, participate in a farm coop, buy our meat etc from local farmers, have a local live theater, help each other in times of emergencies (health, weather, etc). Like me, some also are a bit more self sufficient with solar, wood stove, hunting, etc. The theme is more a community of self-sufficiency.

    As the big cities are getting worse with crime and social issues, I think we will see more and more folks moving rural, not true homesteading but to a simpler more self sufficient life style.

  • #25957

    namelus
    Participant

    @whirlibird um we do chest burgers and bacon cheese burgers with all stuff from this valley but most 80 percent is from this farm. We trade for the cheese  as ours had not aget yet enough. Nothing like Applewood smoked cheddar 5 year old with crispy yet chewy bacon maple cured with a toasted  Portuguese crusty bun.

     

    Everyone has chores here before breakfast get used to it.

     

    The problem is if you are a what I call a solo a small limited family place. There are not enough hands to help with all the work.  There are extra cost to feed and hose that many but the security of 30 members on a defensible piece of farm land with water is something you can not do alone. Or with a small family.

     

    It also allows for more rounded and cross trained over lapped skills. There is some conflicts within the group but those can be managed if you have a strong leader.

     

    It makes you a village with all the skills and trimmings that make life worth while. Our group was started by the menfolk knowing each other from service,  the families integrated with some issues and a few left due to inability to follow the  rules. Those that remain and new families or singles are vetted with a gòod process refined over time.

     

    Now there are several families that have children and a single parent here with other parent at work out of here but have a cohesive plan and central location for them to meet and come here as a team. They are running to something not away from everything a huge difference.

     

  • #25959

    OldMt Woman
    Participant

    It is true that aging means it might be wise to downsize.  We’ve downsized on some things that make me about panic…. thinking about not having those resources any more.  Yet this winter, being as it’s been ….with continuous extraordinary strains, downsizing was a good and absolutely NECESSARY change….for now.

    Namelus….your community would certainly help ease the strain of those who were older or a family who got this danged virus that hangs on and on…  True homesteading alone or small family is super-tough.  Not impossible for many but usually they’ve grown up into the situation.  BUT one significant spanner-in-the-works and so many things can fail….even for experienced folks.  I envy you the group.  Perhaps one day our family will be gathered….finally.  Still too many other responsibilities for that to happen…yet.

    OldMtWoman

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by  OldMt Woman.
    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by  OldMt Woman.
  • #25964

    Crow Bar
    Keymaster

    I dont think I could do a community like Namelus has.

    Something like that was forced on me in the Marines. Our SSGT decided our section should not only work together but live together and had it arranged so we all would be roommates in the barracks.
    I pulled him aside and asked him NOT to roommate me with another CPL. The guy was a world class jerk. Had some really weird ideas about women too. Like, dont leave him alone with a young, under aged girl.
    And likely I would end up killing him.
    The SSGT saw it my way and allowed me to continue being the roommate with a Marine from supply. Him and I got along great.

    I see the local Amish community as being the more ideal. While they all have their own homes and or farms plots of land, they have a very strong sense of community.
    And if S were to HTF, us English are going to need them for their knowledge about horses and how to farm using animal labor. For that, I will gladly be their security force.

  • #25978

    namelus
    Participant

    We do have  a barrack room and we do have a isolation house.   The individual families build their own home with help from the rest. Only thing is most have small kitchenettes and small bathroom. That way we can call farm hand housing. Only main place is large but has the kitchen both indoor and out, and the  clothing washers.

     

    Yes there is private space but everyone is encouraged  to partake is community events… the kids activities brings out most of the adults uNless on duty. One of the families that left was because they did not participate at all.

     

    Right now most build their second home as either a strawbales, earth bag or container as we have the experience to do that fast and inexpensively a earth bag home can be done for under 20k 2400 sqft two levels,3 bedroom  a kitchenette no running water.

     

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