If you are governmentioned employee without pay read this

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  • #7420

    namelus
    Participant

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    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>January 3, 2019
    Dorado, Puerto Rico</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>If you’ve been reading <i>Notes from the Field</i> for any period of time, you know I don’t like paying taxes. That’s why I’m living in Puerto Rico today paying almost nothing.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>And no, it’s not because I’m doing anything illegal.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Puerto Rico is one of the most incredible LEGAL tax havens in the world; under special incentive laws that were passed by the government several years ago, it’s possible to pay just 4% on corporate profits, and 0% tax on investment income like dividends or capital gains.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Don’t get me wrong– the lifestyle here is REALLY nice. The beaches are exceptional, the weather is great, and I’ve been hanging out with a lot of interesting people who are down here doing the same thing.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>But I’m not here for the lifestyle. I’m here because I believe I have a moral obligation to pay as little tax as possible.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>People in the west are fed a line of garbage that if you don’t agree with your government, you make your opinion heard at the voting booth.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>That’s a bunch of bullshit.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Voting accomplishes nothing; it doesn’t change the corrupt game, merely the players.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>The far more powerful way to affect change is to use every legal means at your disposal to stop giving them your money. <b class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Starve the beast.</b></p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>So the next time they waste billions of dollars on a website that doesn’t work, they won’t be doing it with your money.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Instead, you will be free to spend your own savings on what YOU believe is important.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>For example, there are several people here that I’ve recently met who are privately funding a safe house for abused children here in Puerto Rico; I’ll be committing quite heavily to this.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Every year I use my tax savings to fund worthy causes that are either ignored or totally bungled by the government.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>A few years ago in Nepal I paid for food and medicine to be delivered by helicopter to remote mountain villages, and to have the sick and elderly evacuated… because the government had totally screwed up their aid.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>I even funded a new, prosthetic leg for a veteran whose treatment had been rejected by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs on the grounds that the procedure wasn’t FDA approved.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Now the guy is out competing in 5K races and even danced at his own wedding.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Today I’ve found another worthy cause to invest my tax savings: government employees.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Yes I’m serious.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>The government shutdown is now in its 13th day. And to be clear, I LIKE government shutdowns. I think it’s great when the big giant bureaucracy closes its doors.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>But I also recognize there are literally hundreds of thousands of government employees and members of the military who are having a tough time making the rent as a result of this.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>I read that there are 380,000 government employees who have been furloughed.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>And another 420,000 are working without pay (they’re currently suing the government because forcing employees to work without pay is illegal – even for the Uncle Sam).</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>All these folks are having trouble paying their bills.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>So I thought I’d use my tax savings to help furloughed government employees pay their rent.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Relish the irony…</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>So if you’re a US federal government employee who has either been furloughed or is working without pay, and you’re falling behind on expenses, here’s what you need to do:</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>1) Send an email to <b class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>bailout@sovereignman.com</b> from your official .gov email address</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>2) Provide a copy of your lease or mortgage that clearly indicates your current monthly payment</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>3) Provide a recent paystub</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”><b class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>I’m 100% serious about this.</b></p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”><b class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>And while I can’t infinitely fund all 800,000 people, I’m ponying up 5-6 figures to help out. And I’m even reaching out to friends to see if they’ll match my contribution.</b></p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>On a final note… if you work for the NSA or you’re a member of Congress, don’t bother applying.</p>
    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Happy New Year.</p>

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    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>To your freedom,</p>

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    <p class=”bard-text-block style-scope”>Simon Black,
    Founder</p>

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    #7457

    Tolik
    Participant

    I don’t think that quite translated out properly , might want to repost .

    #7472

    Muffy1938
    Participant

    That post is meaningless….might be some interested or good info but totally lost….

    #7480

    Daisy
    Keymaster

    Here it is without the HTML

    January 3, 2019
    Dorado, Puerto Rico

    If you’ve been reading Notes from the Field for any period of time, you know I don’t like paying taxes. That’s why I’m living in Puerto Rico today paying almost nothing.

    And no, it’s not because I’m doing anything illegal.

    Puerto Rico is one of the most incredible LEGAL tax havens in the world; under special incentive laws that were passed by the government several years ago, it’s possible to pay just 4% on corporate profits, and 0% tax on investment income like dividends or capital gains.

    Don’t get me wrong– the lifestyle here is REALLY nice. The beaches are exceptional, the weather is great, and I’ve been hanging out with a lot of interesting people who are down here doing the same thing.

    But I’m not here for the lifestyle. I’m here because I believe I have a moral obligation to pay as little tax as possible.

    People in the west are fed a line of garbage that if you don’t agree with your government, you make your opinion heard at the voting booth.

    That’s a bunch of bullshit.

    Voting accomplishes nothing; it doesn’t change the corrupt game, merely the players.

    The far more powerful way to affect change is to use every legal means at your disposal to stop giving them your money. Starve the beast.

    So the next time they waste billions of dollars on a website that doesn’t work, they won’t be doing it with your money.

    Instead, you will be free to spend your own savings on what YOU believe is important.

    For example, there are several people here that I’ve recently met who are privately funding a safe house for abused children here in Puerto Rico; I’ll be committing quite heavily to this.

    Every year I use my tax savings to fund worthy causes that are either ignored or totally bungled by the government.

    A few years ago in Nepal I paid for food and medicine to be delivered by helicopter to remote mountain villages, and to have the sick and elderly evacuated… because the government had totally screwed up their aid.

    I even funded a new, prosthetic leg for a veteran whose treatment had been rejected by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs on the grounds that the procedure wasn’t FDA approved.

    Now the guy is out competing in 5K races and even danced at his own wedding.

    Today I’ve found another worthy cause to invest my tax savings: government employees.

    Yes I’m serious.

    The government shutdown is now in its 13th day. And to be clear, I LIKE government shutdowns. I think it’s great when the big giant bureaucracy closes its doors.

    But I also recognize there are literally hundreds of thousands of government employees and members of the military who are having a tough time making the rent as a result of this.

    I read that there are 380,000 government employees who have been furloughed.

    And another 420,000 are working without pay (they’re currently suing the government because forcing employees to work without pay is illegal – even for the Uncle Sam).

    All these folks are having trouble paying their bills.

    So I thought I’d use my tax savings to help furloughed government employees pay their rent.

    Relish the irony…

    So if you’re a US federal government employee who has either been furloughed or is working without pay, and you’re falling behind on expenses, here’s what you need to do:

    1) Send an email to bailout@sovereignman.com from your official .gov email address

    2) Provide a copy of your lease or mortgage that clearly indicates your current monthly payment

    3) Provide a recent paystub

    I’m 100% serious about this.

    And while I can’t infinitely fund all 800,000 people, I’m ponying up 5-6 figures to help out. And I’m even reaching out to friends to see if they’ll match my contribution.

    On a final note… if you work for the NSA or you’re a member of Congress, don’t bother applying.

    Happy New Year.

    To your freedom,

    Simon Black

    #7481

    Daisy
    Keymaster

    What an incredible offer that is. And Simon Black is LEGIT.

    #7495

    namelus
    Participant

    Thanks daisy for fixing my horrible cut and paste.

     

    Simon is a person you will always remember after meeting.

    #7512

    Daisy
    Keymaster

    Namelus, not your fault – some emails, when you copy them, show the HTML code as opposed to the content. When you see something in boxes like Simon’s emails, copy within each box individually to avoid that issue in the future.

    What a great share. Simon is amazing.

    #7527

    Molly Malone
    Participant

    OK, I have to say this: I worked as a federal employee for about 5 years. I was a supervisor for all 5 years. I was supervising about 20 people during the 2013 shutdown. I had one employee who earned ~$60,000 a year. She was married to another federal employee who also earned ~$60,000 a year. She went into a hysterical meltdown at the start of the shutdown because, on a joint income of ~$120,000, she and her husband were living paycheck to paycheck and could not survive the loss of even one paycheck. I found, to my amazement, that almost none of my well-compensated staff could survive the loss of one paycheck.

    I hope Mr. Black understand that there are well-compensated, spendthrift federal employees living beyond their means who are going to take advantage of him.

    The mainstream media hates Trump so will publish all the most tragic-sounding tales of whiny federal employees. I think this shutdown, like the 2013 shutdown, is simply exposing how many federal employees manage their money poorly, live beyond their means and save nothing.

    #7534

    James Mitchner
    Participant

    Molly, you are exactly right.  As we ride past those McMansions we should consider that those who dwell in them may be just as tight for cash at the end of the month as anyone else.

    Those federal employees, same as any other employee, not being able to manage a month without a paycheck simply means they were irresponsible in their finances to not having been prepared for a shutdown or any other loss of revenue for at least the short term.

    How many in the prepper community have overlooked that as well?

    #7557

    Crow Bar
    Participant

    @Molly Malone,

    You are not wrong in your assessment.

    Fact is more and more Americans are living paycheck to paycheck.  Government employees included!

    Fact is, as you point out, is most Americans live beyond their means!  While they might dine out 2 or 3 times a week, the Applebees parking lot is ful, it is mostly on credit cards!

    #7584

    Daisy
    Keymaster

    There are all sorts of reasons people might be living paycheck to paycheck. I am personally just getting out of a year of living like that.

    Why? Because my family had two major (to us) medical problems last January and February. My daughter had pneumonia and I had a MRSA infection that required outpatient surgery. It may not sound like a huge amount of money to other folks but between the two issues, it was about $17000. I drained my emergency fund of $6000 that I’d been saving up for years, then moved on to credit cards because when you are sick enough that there’s a risk of death or loss of limb, you do what you’ve gotta do.

    Of course, when I was ill, I was not able to work for several days, which meant the loss of more income since I am self-employed. Meanwhile, bills were still coming due and I had drained every penny out of my accounts to pay for medical care and medication. This meant I was now maxed out on credit cards and in overdraft in every bank account. And penniless. Not a good place to be and not somewhere I’ve been for a long time.

    So for the past year, I’ve been eking by, paycheck to paycheck, getting all that debt paid off and paying tremendous amounts of interest.

    I’m not saying this to have anyone feel sorry for me – we survived this and I am back to building a modest emergency fund again. But I just wanted to give some perspective that there are all sorts of reasons to be paycheck to paycheck. It just takes one thing going terribly wrong to really mess up your budget.

    I’m sure hoping that 2019 is much less stressful.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by  Daisy.
    #7605

    Molly Malone
    Participant

    @daisy, I am sorry to hear you got hit with $17,000 in medical debt, and I hope 2019 is better for you.

    #7726

    Crow Bar
    Participant

    @daisy,

    I can relate.

    When the ACA first kicked in, we had a medical expense that came out of the blue.

    Contrary to what the ACA pundits said, we could not write off the medical expenses on our taxes as they claimed!  So, that year was a very rough year.  A second PT job helped, we reorganized our money strategy, and we did come out of it ok.  For that matter, we continued to act as if we were still in a financial emergency, and as a result have been able to pay off nearly all our debt, and have a good size savings account.

    #7751

    Daisy
    Keymaster

    Thanks Molly! I’m sure it will be. 🙂 I’m an optimist!

    Crowbar – the ACA is a joke. We’d be spending nearly $2K a month on it if I had it and then I’d still have a 10K deductible. I’d rather just deal with this kind of thing like I did last year and hope no one has cancer or a heart attack.

    And I didn’t mean to get the thread off-track. I just wanted to point out how easily people can move from comfortable to paycheck-to-paycheck.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by  Daisy.
    #8077

    Loving Life
    Participant

    Some people get caught in the living paycheck to paycheck due to misfortunes. A few like Daisy throttle back their lifestyle and get themselves back on the right track. It is not easy. I have been there.

    I have never owned a new car. As a military commander, I would watch as my lower to middle enlisted and officer ranks would drive in with their new cars that they could barely afford the payments on and know that they had little to no savings. I heard some of them snicker at my old Saab, which I drove for 12 years. I remember many of them coming into my office with financial woes, especially during the last furlough (travel reimbursements were being held back).

    It has become an expected right to live paycheck to paycheck, so you do not defer your instant gratification. We must have that new phone or car. Maybe this furlough will be a wake up call to some. I know the last furlough was to some of my junior enlisted and officers.

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