The Squatter – Thinking about building it.

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This topic contains 23 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Wolf Brother 5 days, 1 hour ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #8885

    Crow Bar
    Participant

    Looking at the plans, again, I think I would go with a gambrel roof, add the loft for a larger sleeping area, insulate with 7 inches of R7 spray foam, the cast iron stove, the knee wall with the rain catchment system.

    Be even better if you could install a small cellar under the cabin.

    Water?

    #8886

    Wolf Brother
    Participant

    I appreciate the discussion/thoughts/suggestions.

    I am thinking about using this as a “Little Home”.  As noted in my first post – 16′ long, 16′ wide, with 16′ sidewalls.
    Either a concrete floor or a plywood covered 2 by on roofing felt floor.  7′ up the bottom of the loft rafters making roughly a 12′ x 8′ loft area.   MAYBE a 4′ knee wall, which would make all of the 16×16 area useable and would make the loft 12xclose to 10.  A knee wall would allow gutters at the bottom of the sides making rainwater collection easier.

    Crow Bar – Looking at the plans, again, I think I would go with a gambrel roof, add the loft for a larger sleeping area, insulate with 7 inches of R7 spray foam, the cast iron stove, the knee wall with the rain catchment system.

    A gambrel roof would allow for more space but adds construction complexity I’m trying not to have.  Spray foam insulation is my primary plan for now.

    GnomeInPlaid – climate – 2×4 construction will not hold up to heavy snow – fireplace at the end wall. Expansion and contraction from heating and cooling will cause the meeting surface between the stones and the wood to separate and eventually rot. You’ll also lose a lot of heat through the rocks to the outside. I have my wood stove centrally located.

    The roof pitch is a 1 to 2 run/rise.  For every 1 foot of run the rise on the roof is 2 feet.  I do believe it will shed snow fairly good.  You are right about 2×4 construction not being as strong as it could be.  My initial plan is to use 2x8s on 16 inch centers.  The cross pieces between the 2x8s (to be where the sheet metal side is nailed) will probably be 2×4 every 2′. Interior sheathing is going to be 1/2 plywood glued and screwed.  That will make the 16×16 sidewalls fairly rigid and insulated as noted in my  reply to Crow Bar.  I am planning on a glass front wood burning stove for heat and for something to look at, at night. I will be bringing in an outside air pipe for the stove.

    The Loft cross pieces will be bolted to sidewall members and will provide additional rigidity to the structure.

    Climate – I live in Texas – so one day I can be melting from the heat and the next be “lower posterior orifice” deep in snow.  My plan is to have a thru the wall by the front door High Efficiency window A/C for cooling and screened windows loft and bottom – front and back for cross ventilation.

    Right now – it’s all just a plan.

     

    #8917

    GnomeInPlaid
    Participant

    You have some very well thought out ideas.  I’m sure that by the time you get to the actual construction phase, you’ll have planned out all the details for something that’s very nice and functional.

     

     

    #8961

    namelus
    Participant

    Was thinking on your flooring have you seen you tube channel primative technology, it has lots of wonderful ideas on building abodes from nothing. You understand yet man never says one word.

    #8962

    namelus
    Participant

    If you want your roof to outlast you make it from two layers of 1/2 inch ply layer 90 degrees overlap glue and screw , then 1/8 torch on. For metal roof use a method called standing double seam  with 11 inch pans and one continuous  length.  You might want to not have apex roof, if you have off set roof you can use Windows at top  for lighting and ventilation. Basically instead of meeting at apex the one roof is 18 inches lower allowing for Windows.  Aim south for warm north for cooler

    #8963

    Wolf Brother
    Participant

    namelus – Was thinking on your flooring have you seen you tube channel primative technology, it has lots of wonderful ideas on building abodes from nothing.
    You understand yet man never says one word.

    I have watched them and am impressed both by his building skill and the skill he shows in communicating it without saying a word.

    namelus – If you want your roof to outlast you make it from two layers of 1/2 inch ply layer 90 degrees overlap glue and screw , then 1/8 torch on. For metal roof use a method called standing double seam with 11 inch pans and one continuous length. You might want to not have apex roof, if you have off set roof you can use Windows at top for lighting and ventilation. Basically instead of meeting at apex the one roof is 18 inches lower allowing for Windows. Aim south for warm north for cooler

    Not sure what ” then 1/8 torch on. ” means. If I have heard of it, it’s under different words.

    My plan is to have screened windows at both ends, one just under the apex of each end for loft ventilation and at least one on the bottom at each end. And if I’m grid connected a high efficiency window A/C mounted thru the wall at one end.

    To get to where I’m at in life I have worked doing various types of construction, including putting together metal buildings. One brand of those buildings is called Butler buildings. The roof is going to be made with the metal sheets used in that type building.

    I do appreciate your input, it makes me think and re-think.

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 18 hours ago by  Wolf Brother.
    #8969

    namelus
    Participant

    It is 1/8 of an inch thick torch on tar that comes in a roll, the thin stuff is not nearly as effective and a peel and stick is pretty much junk for long term.

    #8970

    namelus
    Participant

    any building with penetration with screws to hold in place is a leak point double seam has none only venting through roof penetrates, bullet proof system that flexes and contracts with bulilding. The expansion and contraction loosen screws and the neoprene  washer on screws breaks down in 5-7 years leaving you with pin hole leaks all over.

     

    The reason most don’t do standing double seam is labour costs, 3x more than standard metal bolt on roof. In old days it was called cathedral roofing it lasts 100 s of years. Just don’t go cheap on gauge no less than 24 gsuge. If you want forever roofing check out company

    https://www.rheinzink.com/en/products/roof-systems/

     

    #8984

    Wolf Brother
    Participant

    1/8 of an inch thick torch on tar that comes in a roll.
    OK, yup I know about it. The guy I worked for called it rolled mastic.

    That’s been a problem on metal roofed buildings screwed to metal purlins.  Less so metal roofed buildings screwed to wood purlins.  Essentially non-existent if you do the labor intensive dob of silicon caulk (or other elastomeric caulk) where each screw is.

    One idea I’m kicking around is to build two of them, with a “Dog Run” roof between them to allow for a covered access between the two.

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