This map shows the US really has 11 separate 'nations' with different cultures

Home Forums News & Current Events This map shows the US really has 11 separate 'nations' with different cultures

This topic contains 4 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  John Park 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #24682

    Daisy
    Keymaster

    I thought this was pretty interesting. I agree for the most part.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/regional-differences-united-states-2018-1

     

  • #24686

    anon 411
    Participant

    I read the book mentioned in the article (Daisy it was in one of your lists, I believe). The book certainly explains why the northerners think they have all the answers and everybody else is stupid. Read the book, it answers a lot of questions.

  • #24689

    namelus
    Participant

    The eastern and western parts of canada are wrong. East coasters in the maritime are bi lingual bUT don’t identify with Quebec french in fact there is animosity.

     

    On west coast vancouver is like commiefornia  but the nOrth is very much like alberta and prairies due to the type of occupation farming and resource extraction.

     

     

  • #24702

    Tolik
    Participant

    I always have to laugh when people from Quebec call themselves French . They are about as French , as I am Chinese . They have nothing in common with REAL French . Face it guys , your CANADIANS . To much time has passed , even the language is different . Americans have no more in common with the Limeys now , than we do with Easter Island  , or Brazil with Portugal .

  • #24704

    John Park
    Participant

    It’s a good concept, but doomed to be inaccurate. States themselves are often quite divided. I’ve lived all over Yankeedom and can conclude the vast majority of Massachusetts, southern New Hampshire (where the majority of the population is), southern Maine and almost the entire coast (again, the population dense areas), and then large swaths of Vermont (most notably the population dense Chittenden and Washington counties) – are all deeply blue to extremely progressive.

    The more sparsely populated areas of rural inland Maine, northern New Hampshire, and northeastern Vermont are red areas.

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