Why a basic knowledge of sewing will come in handy

Home Forums DIYs Sewing and Needlework Why a basic knowledge of sewing will come in handy

This topic contains 25 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  Wolphene Howlett 1 month ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)
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  • #4569

    Atypical Sapien
    Participant

    My wife is currently teaching me how to sew. It’s one of the new skills to learn this winter  We purchased a used Thompson light commercial model pw  301 and are both learning how to use it.  Not much help on YouTube. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

    #4574

    Wolphene Howlett
    Participant

    @Olivia Green

    You are most welcome, Olivia. Glad I could help!

    #4575

    Wolphene Howlett
    Participant

    @Atypical Sapien

    You didn’t mention if you have the machine’s instruction manual. So I went on a search and found this: https://www.sew4less.com/product/9609/Thompson_PW_301_Instruction_Manual_and_parts_list

    #5502

    Old Goat
    Participant

    I keep a bucket with sewing supplies in it and just keep adding to it when ever I have a few cents to spare. I couldn’t believe how much it cost to get a non power driven machine (that is the foot peddle variety) so its just going to be by hand as usual. When did home ec get such a bad name! I can’t believe how many kids can’t cook or wash these days. I’ve had to wash on a wash board its no fun and sewing get a bit harder when your hands don’t work so well any more.

    #5516

    namelus
    Participant

    Learn some basic skin sutures life savers

    #6272

    Atypical Sapien
    Participant

    Thanks for the link Wolphene.! I neglected to click the notify me box and just found your reply!

     

    #6874

    Littlesister
    Participant

    Bill B, Where did you get a hand crank sewing machine. I also have arthritic hands and also concerned that if we were hit by an EMP, an electric sewing machine might be useless. I have been making baby blankets that are simple and can be used to put on floor to lay baby on to play.

    #7461

    woodsrunner
    Participant

    A comment on needles- there are needles well made, the old ones made in US or England, and there are new ones made in China that are not nearly as good.  Perhaps you can find good old ones at garage sales.  People just don’t use or know what they have anymore.

    #7462

    Crow Bar
    Participant

    Ok, can anyone recommend a book on how to sew?

    No links to YouTube, or pdf.  I am a more of a I like to have a book in hand to read from than some electronic device.

    #7467

    woodsrunner
    Participant

    Reader’s digest put out a book called “Complete Guide to Sewing”.  I have it but hardly use it because I know how to sew.  The most important book would be the manual to your particular machine unless it is a treadle.

    Many years ago when I was in high school, I had moved to a new school and had never sewn before and the kids in the new school had had two years of sewing.  My mother didn’t sew so when she bought the pattern it was a complicated blouse and another girl in the class who had sewn since she was seven years old bailed me out over and over.  I am still grateful to her whenever I think about it.

    #7956

    Wolphene Howlett
    Participant

    I recently finished up darning some socks and realized that I had a tiny treasure in my hand! Years ago, I was going to toss out some things that the kids were no longer interested in. One of those things was a hollow plastic egg that came apart in the middle to hold Easter candy, nuts or small edibles. I decided to keep it and have used it as my darning kit ever since. It holds my darning needles and spare strands of darning thread (wrapped on small pieces of heavy, stiff paper) from the nearly-empty thread spools. I use the egg inside the sock I’m repairing to have a surface to work against. This egg is stored in a drawstring bag that I made out of an old sock that was beyond repair; I just cut across the edge at the point of the heel and stitch the edge so it won’t unravel. Then I basted a narrow ribbon around the top as a drawstring, about 1/2-inch from the stitched edge, and finished with tying two large beads at the ends of the drawstring to keep it secure. I added a couple of extra spools of darning thread, too. If I find more socks to repair, I just look for my ol’ sock bag and I’m ready for work!

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)

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